Changes over time in HRSW

writing1Following on from celebrating the benefits of Reading Recovery (previous post), let’s look at the development 2 students made in Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words from the beginning of Reading Recovery to the end. HRSW is one of the tasks from the Observation Survey.

Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words is a task to assess phonemic awareness by determining how the child represents sounds within words when writing (can the student hear the parts of a word and can he / she choose appropriate letters to represent those sounds, and can the student write the letters?)

English is the second language for both of these students.

I read the sentence to each student slowly so that he / she had time to hear each word, and ponder which sounds could be heard, and choose and write letters to go with the sounds.

Student 1

Beginning of Reading Recovery

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The sentence is: I have a big dog at home. Today I am going to take him to school.

End of Reading Recovery

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The sentence is: I can see the red boat that we are going to have a ride in.

The score was not perfect but it was a big improvement. It is not a spelling task. The word boat lost no points because the ‘a’ cannot be heard. Extra letters within a word do not lose points, but writing ‘u’ instead of ‘i’ in ride does lose a point.

Also note how much better the writing looks. There are spaces between every word and capital letters are used appropriately.

Student 2

Beginning of Reading Recovery

beg1

The sentence is: I have a big dog at home. Today I am going to take him to school.

She could hear some sounds but she did not know how to write the letters. Mostly she kept shaking her head to indicate that she did not know any sounds in the word.

End of Reading Recovery

end1

The sentence is: I can see the red boat that we are going to have a ride in.

Again the score is not perfect but it shows enormous development. Look at how much more she could write compared to her first writing.

She wrote ‘u’ twice for ‘i’ in ride. (The 2 students did the task separately so no copying was involved!) ‘sh’ was written for ‘th’ in that and for some reason an ‘i’ was added to we. (I suspect she wasn’t sure which one it was so she put both- clever!)

These students were random examples. They were not my ‘best’ students. They are a snapshot of the difference that Reading Recovery can make to our students.

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