Book orientation

A book orientation is the same as a book introduction. It happens before the student attempts to read a new book for the first time.

The following video was published on Mar 22, 2015 by UALRCenter4Literacy

The Reading Recovery teacher scaffolds (supports) the student during the book introduction and the first reading of a new L14  book called The Missing Necklace.

The Reading Recovery teacher provided her student with some information about the story and she asked him questions that prompted him to wonder about what was happening, and what may happen next. He was in control of the book. (He held the book and he turned the pages.) The student searched the pictures and he told the teacher what he observed.

Sometimes the teacher pointed out something in the picture in order to add to the meaning. She also asked him some questions to check that he understood the vocabulary (e.g. detective, chipmunk). He demonstrated a good understanding of the story when he reacted to the humour at the end of the book. The teacher responded to his enjoyment of the story, and she connected the story to his own experiences.

He is likely to read the book very well the next time he reads it as he understands it so well. Perhaps he will add some more expression to his voice to make it sound more interesting.

He is learning ways to orientate himself to a book when the teacher is not with him.

All of the teachers are currently very busy with writing reports. I am also gathering information in preparation for the mid year reports. I have been re administering parts of the Observation Survey in order to check for progress. It’s always interesting (and rewarding) to look back at what the student could do at the beginning of Reading Recovery, and to compare it with what is known now.

Writing

The Reading Recovery teachers met in Ballarat for our Ongoing Professional Learning this past Friday. It is always good to catch up with the other teachers to learn from each other and our hardworking tutor.

The focus this time was writing. It is often a challenge to lift the performance of our students in this area. The majority of students seem to find reading easier than writing.

We watched a podcast, delved into the writing section of our new guide book, discussed handouts and generally felt challenged to try some new strategies with our students.

As a result of all the recent discussion about writing, I have added a page to this blog with some suggested writing goals (adapted from a handout) that may correspond to the reading levels.

Reading together

Again, I am encouraging parents to read to their children because there are so many benefits.

This article (click on the picture) was written by Deborah Gough (Sydney Morning Herald, 2013) and quotes Bridie Raban (University of Melbourne’s Graduate School Of Education).

 Some quotes from the article:

Parents who stop reading to their children once they reach primary school are missing out on an emotionally rich time …

…a Galaxy poll of 1200 Australian parents found that just 23 per cent of parents read to their child every day… Just four per cent read daily to their child by the time they were aged 9 to 12 years.

Parents blamed making dinner and doing housework …, work … and tiredness… (for not reading to  / with their child).

Nine out of 10 parents encouraged their children to read… the most common incentive was giving children books as gifts…

Reading tips:

  1. Make a bedtime story something to look forward to (a treat).
  2. Be a good role model. Do your children see you reading?
  3. Join a local library.
  4. Read books on different topics that interest your children.
  5. Play word games together.
  6. Talk with your child. It’s a good way to learn new words, and to learn more about a language. (How children talk will influence the words that they will expect to see as they are reading.)

Reading aloud to children is important because it helps them pick up information and skills they need.

Children’s reading experts agree that reading aloud is the easiest and most effective way to turn children into lifelong readers.

Continue reading aloud after your children can read. All readers will enjoy listening to books that they can’t yet manage on their own.

Previous posts: Reading Aloud To Children,   Reading Aloud To Children 2,

Reading Aloud To Children 3Share The ReadingReading To Brothers And Sisters

See also Sharing Books With Young Children (Scroll down to the Reading section.)

 

How do we learn to read?

I was impressed with an article called How Do We Learn To Read by  (Associate Professor in Language, Literacy and TESL, University of Canberra)

You may like to read her views on comprehension (meaning) and decoding (recognising words by how they look).

Her article is similar to a former post I wrote- Reading Is About Meaning.

I have added a new page to this blog where I will link articles that I think are of particular interest to teachers. This article is one of them, but some parents might also find it to be interesting.