Oral literacy

Below is a demonstration video of a teacher using the PM Oral Literacy Sequencing Cards. It shows the types of questions that children can be asked to promote thinking about the story and retelling what happened and why. The children look at the picture cards (pages from the book), and use their prior knowledge (own experiences) to answer questions about who is in the book, and the setting (where it takes place).

The teacher uses the vocabulary (words) from within the book and encourages the children to think about some words that describe the characteristics of the characters, e.g. big, enormous, small. The events that happen in the story are sequenced (this came 1st, then this, this was last) and the children can describe the problem (no fish) and the outcome (didn’t give up, fish came). There was also a question asking the children to think about a possible answer that was not directly in the book (Mother Bear could have gone …..)

At home, you might like to ask your child some similar questions about a book. He or she might occasionally like to draw some of the things that happened (in order) and either talk about it or write about it (you might write down his / her sentences to make the task easier).

Becoming A Writer

Last week was my first week back after minor surgery. With 2 professional development days, and being absent in the middle of the week, it was a rather slow start for my students.

On Friday the Reading Recovery teachers went to Ballarat for our latest Reading Recovery Ongoing Professional Learning session. The overall theme was writing. This included watching a video of Noella Mackenzie. She talks to parents about how young children explore writing at home, and during the early years of preschool / school. Children learn many things, including talking and writing, by observing, copying and interacting with those around them.

It is worth watching the video, even if you no longer have very young children.

To view the video click on the picture to the left.

 

 

You can download the accompanying brochure from Noella Mackenzie by clicking on this picture. (Or here for a different version.)

 

A valuable quote from the transcript of the video is-

As you talk with children you help them to develop their language use, you help them to build their vocabulary and they will notice more about the world around them.  Knowing lots of words helps with reading and writing.